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  • Annotate

This wiki space contains archival documentation of Project Bamboo, April 2008 - March 2013.

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For context on the nature and purpose of Theme Groups, as well as a complete list of Theme Groups and their definitions, please visit this page's parent, Theme Groups

Scholarly activities listed as part of each Theme Group are harvested from contributions to Themes pages during the community design period between Workshop One and Workshop Two. Lists of scholarly activities are not intended or expected to be comprehensive. Making the included activities more comprehensive and defining each at an appropriate level of detail is expected to be an activity of working groups in the period between Workshops Two and Three.

Definition

"Annotate" as broadly defined encompasses not only the association of notes describing a scholar's observations and thoughts about objects (crudely put, a "post-it" or "index card" mode of annotation), but also associating provenance, credit, and citation metadata; associating tags; associating categories; and otherwise organizing into taxonomies and ontologies a group of objects of scholarly interest. It is closely related to "Consider," as annotation is a means of recording the iterative and evolutionary products of consideration.

Included Themes

Scholarly Activities in this Theme Group

NOTE:  quotations below are from the "Summit on Digital Tools for the Humanities," UVA, 2005, Final Report

  • Associate a note (phrase, comment, paragraph, essay) with an object or set of objects of scholarly interest
  • Tag (with a word or phrase) an object or set of objects of scholarly interest
  • Associate provenance metadata with an object or set of objects of scholarly interest
  • Associate credit for contribution to the digital commons of an object or set of objects of scholarly interest
  • Associate a citation (e.g., a book or article) with an object or set of objects of scholarly interest
  • Associate a date with an object or set of objects of scholarly interest
  • Associate a cultural, social, or political movement or style or event with an object or set of objects of scholarly interest
  • Associate a material or substrate with an object or set of objects of scholarly interest (e.g., these texts are inscribed on clay tablets)
  • Categorize an object or set of objects of scholarly interest in a formal or informal taxonomy
  • Categorize an object or set of objects of scholarly interest in a broadly-accepted or provisional (perhaps local/evolving) ontology
  • Record an assertion about the relationship of an object or set of objects of scholarly interest to another (e.g., original expression of a concept, copy of another object, part of a whole, edition of a text, version of a musical score)
  • Assert responsibility/credit for publishing artifacts to the digital commons
  • Record an evaluation of an object or set of objects of scholarly interest (e.g., evaluating authenticity; evaluating quality)
  • Record catalog data about an object or set of objects of scholarly interest
  • Highlight a part of an object or set of objects of scholarly interest, associating the highlighting with an "interestingness" or "relevance" score in a scholar-defined context (e.g., tag a portion of a video or audio recording as relevant to a particular inquiry)
  • Mark (identify) parts of an object of scholarly interest using a formal grammar (e.g., TEI-encode a text)
  • Record "real time" annotation of experiential objects of scholarly interest (e.g., a performance)
  • Applies to all "Annotate" activities:
    • Associate a single note/tag/citation/etc. with multiple objects of scholarly interest ("one or more points of attachment"), including objects of different types (e.g., text, video, audio)
    • Associate a single note/tag/citation/etc. with a scholar-defined part of an object or set of objects of scholarly interest ("points of attachment" at "demarcated parts" at "arbitrary levels of detail")
    • Classify an annotation as belonging to a type (a note, a tag, a citation, a record of provenance, etc.)
    • Allow annotation to refer to a local, shared or cannonical copy of an object or set of objects of scholarly interest
    • Associate a set of annotations with some standard grammar, taxonomy, or ontology
    • Extract annotations (all or a specified subset) associated with an object or set of objects of scholarly interest in one or more standard grammers
    • Allow annotations to be aggregated in repositories so they can be shared among a community of interest, preserving the contributor's right to set access permissions
    • Associate a persistent URI with an object or set of objects of scholarly interest, including an annotation
    • Reference a persistent URI for an object being annotated
    • An "object of scholarly interest" may be a thing (book, image, etc.) or a service or algorithm used in the course of scholarly activity (e.g., a data mining algorithm applied to a text, using a specific version of service hosted at a specific institution)