Navigation:
Documentation
Archive



Page Tree:

Child pages
  • Giving Back to the Community

This wiki space contains archival documentation of Project Bamboo, April 2008 - March 2013.

Skip to end of metadata
Go to start of metadata

Giving Back to the Community

Definition

This theme has been merged into Humanities Outreach and is now closed for edits. Please make any further changes on that theme's page. 

Scholars are becoming more connected with the public at large. The community provides scholars with data, and scholars give back to the community in some form.


 

Name(s)

Institution(s)

Proposed/originated by:

Quinn Dombrowski

University of Chicago

Current facilitator(s)

Facilitator_Name_Here_(optional)

Facilitator_Institution_Here_(optional)


Back to Identify Themes page...


What tools, standards, organizations, or efforts exist in this area of scholarly practice?

Item

Description - what is it?

URL or other reference

Centre de Ressources pour la Description de l'Oral

This is a digital archive of currently 1371 publicly accessible recorded documents in 90 languages, fully transcribed, annotated and translated, where one may follow the text as one listens. I'm sorry to say that the contributors have spent so much time on their texts that no one has translated the site into English, but I hope you will enjoy it nonetheless! (Margaret Dunham)

http://crdo.risc.cnrs.fr/exist/crdo


What tools, standards, organizations, or efforts are missing from this area of scholarly practice?

Item

Description - what is it?

URL or other reference

sound_byte_name_or_description (your_name)

summary_description (your_name)

http://www.interesting_thing.org


What part of this area of scholarly practice is within Project Bamboo scope, and why?

Item

Description - what is it?

Why is it in scope?

sound_byte_name_or_description (your_name)

summary_description (your_name)

explanation_of_why_in_scope (your_name)


What part of this area of scholarly practice is outside Project Bamboo scope, and why?

Item

Description - what is it?

Why is it out of scope?

sound_byte_name_or_description (your_name)

summary_description (your_name)

explanation_of_why_out_of_scope (your_name)


References

References (e.g., material from Workshop 1 notes or flipcharts)

Contributor

  •  Give back. Similar to dissemination, but different. Pay subject for time and work. Useful to own research career, too. Give back in negotiated value. (Ex. 3 scribe notes, 1c-A)
  • Engage users in folksonomic tagging, giving meaning to a scholarly object, identifying the value or significance of a scholarly object (Ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b-C)
  • Engaging people in disambiguation or correction of non-automatable data
    • Might look to a member of the public like "playing a game"
    • Might not be so interesting to people ... must distinguish between scholarly and general-public communities (Ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b-C)
  • Performance in public (Ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b-C)
  • Service-teaching or service-research: combining or orienting scholarly activity with community service (Ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b-C)
  • The boundary of the academy is made permeable by the border-dissolving nature of the internet; and also by prevalence of life-long learning ... the geographical and "must have ID" barriers are dissolved (Ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b-C)
  • Establish two way processes that allow engagement with a "public" outside the university (e.g., w/o university-specific "credentials" / authentication/authorization) (Ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b-C)
  • "Discursive forms" ... different types of events that invite engagement might be a way to think about what scholarly activities address or approach public/community participation. (Ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b-C)
  • Service learning, service trips, internships (putting students into spaces outside the academy) (Ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b-C)
  • Public being the subject of 1 research ... some conversation here about whether this is a good or a problematic thing ... perhaps better to say that public is the source of information of interest (Ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b-C)
  • Explaining to the public why and how work of humanists matters ... to make sure there is public support for funding agencies like the NEH ... but does drive toward relevance dilute the intellectual value of a scholar's work. Oddity of humanities scholarship is that it operates in a way that values scarcity: a thing that is little studied is of more value than something that has been thoroughly chewed over. (Ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b-C)
  • Any field can benefit by delivering what one knows to a broader (including a public) audience. Might Bamboo facilitate delivery to that broader audience? What about delivery platforms for non-traditional artifacts of scholarship? A filtering mechanism that allows people to find/identify the scholarly artifacts that might interest them. (Ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b-C)
  • the more you engage people, the more they tell you how to behave and interact to be a decent human being. (Ex. 4 scribe notes, 1c-A)
  • so what you do with [oral history] after that could be something traditional (e.g. paper or book) but you could also go back to the person you interviewed and have them comment on it the tools we're talking about and the significance of user participation can lead to a more dialogic product, and those exchanges can lead somewhere interesting (Ex. 5 scribe notes, 1b-B)
  • was working with urban Appalachians, had been documenting one guy's house, didn't have a wide-angle lens, tried to capture interiors... this guy offered to take pictures of his house (Ex. 5 scribe notes, 1b-B)
  • the idea of the subject of study speaking back goes back to a broader idea where the study itself is reflexive, there is a general ethos about the significance of being reflexive in your methodology (Ex. 5 scribe notes, 1b-B)
  • talking about giving something back. This kind of return isn't characteristic of much of humanities. The desire to return to the studied community. Reciprocity. Principle of fairness: someone shares something of themselves with you, you owe something back (Ex. 5 scribe notes, 1c-A)
  • Fieldwork needs to be returned to the source communities. Requires an archive, could lead to unexpected use later. Public and academic constituencies. Can be produced in different formats. People who engage in fieldwork are both creators and critics. The concept of a "public humanist" is not very well developed, even though there are public humanities councils in each state. Digital media allows one to perhaps reach broader constituencies. (Ex. 5 scribe notes, 1b-E)

Quinn Dombrowski

  • What about nontraditional schools, independent scholars? Example: Pixar University (Ex 1 scribe notes, 1d-G)
  • Need to take public scholarship, public humanities seriously (Ex 1 scribe notes, 1d-G)
  • biggest question -- scope, NYPL doesn't have faculty ("library for the unaffiliated") valued added by researchers, but which kind? GATEWAY [...] for enthusiasts and amateurs and independent scholars, non-university universities (Ex 1 scribe notes, 1d-F)

Steve Masover

Back to Identify Themes page...

1 Comment

  1. Unknown User (margaret.dunham@persee.fr)

    Digital archiving is a great way to give back to a community - especially in the case of lesser studied languages. For example putting transcribed recordings of stories and myths on the internet allows the speakers themselves to listen to them (such as urban dwellers who live far from the story-telling elders) and also makes them proud of their language (which in turn can lead them to raise their children in a bilingual environment instead of striving to only speak the 'dominant' language to them).