This wiki space contains archival documentation of Project Bamboo, April 2008 - March 2013.

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WORK IN PROGRESS

This is an outline for Phase 1 (24 months) of a Bamboo Implementation Proposal.

The purpose of this document is to provide information to institutions and organizations participating in the Bamboo Planning Process so that they can help determine (1) the long term future of Bamboo and (2) define what activities Bamboo will carry out in its first implementation phase. The intent of this document is to solicit community input toward the ongoing development and revision of the implementation proposal. As this is an early draft, it is not yet a commitment to carry out all or any of this work.

Please note that we are updating this document frequently based on wide ranging input from the Bamboo community. These updates will occur periodically and will be indicated as ".1", ".2", ".3", etc updates. In addition, we will occasionally make major document revisions. These are noted as "1.X", "2.X", and so forth. Between major document revisions there may be some inconsistencies in language used between the sections of the document.

4 - Major Areas of Work

Table of Contents:

In the current draft, this document section is a high-level summary of the major areas of work the Bamboo Project is considering carrying out over the first two years of implementation (2010-2011). This summary was derived from the Bamboo Community's discussion of and voting on the 7-10 year Program Document at Bamboo Workshop 4 (April 16-18), and further discussion with the Bamboo Leadership Council. In this document the eleven areas of work presented in the 7-10 year Bamboo Program Document have been combined and narrowed down into three areas work for the first two years of implementation. The table at the end of this introduction explains the the relationship of Program Document to this first draft of the Implementation plan.

Four major areas of activity are described for the initial implementation phase of Bamboo. In combination, and at levels of investment to be determined in conversation with institutions navigating toward participation in the implementation phase, these areas aim to realize the Bamboo vision articulated in the Program Document of a "Forum" across disciplines and communities concerned with the humanities and digital humanities; as well as that of building the "Cloud" - a shared and sustainable infrastructure for digital scholarship across institutions and organizations in higher education. Each of these areas of work contain a number of "Bamboo Labs" - that is, teams made up of multiple institutions engaged in exploring, planning, building, and sustaining core components of Bamboo.

It is important to note that this draft includes early examples of work plans for several major areas and is far from definitive. Program Staff will use this evolving document as a framework for several rounds of discussions with institutions participating in Bamboo, and as a core of the Bamboo Implementation Proposal.

Mapping Areas of Work: Program Document Discussion Draft to Bamboo Implementation Proposal

Program Document Discussion Draft 1.0

 

Bamboo Implementation v0.4

3.1 Scholarly Network

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4.1 - Scholarly Networking

4.2 Bamboo Exchange

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4.1 - Scholarly Networking

3.2 Scholarly Narratives

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4.2 - Bamboo Atlas

3.3 Recipes (Workflow)

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4.2 - Bamboo Atlas

3.4 Tools & Content Guide

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4.2 - Bamboo Atlas

3.5 Education & Curricular Materials

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4.2 - Bamboo Atlas

4.1 Services Atlas

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4.2 - Bamboo Atlas

4.4 Tool and Application Alignment Partnerships (TAAP)

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4.3 - Bamboo Services Platform

4.5 Content Interoperability Partnerships (CIP)

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4.3 - Bamboo Services Platform

4.3 Shared Services Lifecycle

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4.3 - Bamboo Services Platform

3.6 Bamboo Community Environment(s)

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4.4 - Bamboo Community

4.1 - Scholarly Networking

The Scholarly Networking area of work will create two types of software: a set of small components, which we're calling "gadgets", that will plug in to existing research environments and social platforms; and a group of new services, which will filter information from several sources (including the Atlas) and supply relevant and interesting material to the gadgets. Together, these gadgets and services will build connections among people from all professions within the Arts & Humanities research community, for the purpose of inspiring collaborations and discovering new resources across Bamboo and beyond. Several teams will develop these gadgets and connection services, each providing specific scholarship-centric networking and/or resource exchange functionality. The defining vision of the Scholarly Networking area is to actively deliver interesting and relevant connections directly into the places where scholars already do their work.

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4.2 - Bamboo Atlas

The Bamboo Atlas will enable articulation, collection, review, and discovery of scholarly methods and digital technology that supports scholarship. Functionality - storage, organization, annotation, rating, review, search, and discovery - will be optimized to support the formation of communities of interest in humanities scholarship and support.

Scholars, librarians, and technologists will each find avenues into a rich store of practices and generalized workflows (a.k.a. "recipes") derived from those practices. Generalized workflows will include hyperlinked references to digital tools; to digital content; and to defined activities that involve using tools to examine, organize, annotate, and transform content. Tools will be further linked to technology services from which they are partly or wholly composed. Each of these elements and the relationships between them may be richly annotated with reviews, ratings, and descriptive tags (keywords). Atlas consumers will be able to use multiple methods of search and discovery that align to different user perspectives. Materials of interest and relevance can be surfaced via tailored filtering based on reviews, ratings, and tags related to self-identified areas of interest. Alternatively, filters may be based on contributions by trusted members of a scholarly community.

Initial scholar participation will be seeded by humanities faculty, including leaders in their discipline, whose participation will form a part of their institution's contribution to Project Bamboo. Incentives for ongoing contribution to the Atlas is key to the effort's success; incentives will include peer-reviewed publication of scholarly methodologies linked to Project Bamboo, and Atlas participation as an element of partnership with tool, application, and content projects (described in the Bamboo Services Platform section of this proposal). The Atlas will be further seeded by integration with existing efforts to catalog practice and technology as applied to the humanities. Over time, a gravity of proven utility and desire to participate in a vital network of engaged, collaborative scholarship will draw more and ongoing participation.

The Bamboo Atlas will be built as a services "back-end" that will enable the initial interfaces developed through close, iterative consultation with faculty and other Atlas users. The Atlas services will support a proliferation of interfaces, including unanticipated "mashups" implemented by interested parties outside or at the periphery of the Bamboo community. Human and machine interfaces to the Atlas materials will be enabled to permit presentations and analyses of the data by general or specialized communities of interest, as well as by those interested in humanist methodologies and their intersections with technology as an object of scholarship in and of itself.

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4.3 - Bamboo Services Platform

A Bamboo Services Platform ("Platform") is foundational technology necessary to support software services for arts and humanities scholarship. Bamboo Services will run (be deployed) on a Bamboo Services Platform, as web browsers and word processors run on an operating system (e.g., Microsoft Windows).

Broadly accepted best practices in software engineering will be applied to refinement of services in iterative stages, making the software more reliable, interoperable, and maintainable over time. Bamboo's "Shared Services Lifecycle" will describe sequential stages of refinement, and the steps required for services to evolve from one stage to the next. In the most evolved stages of this lifecycle, services will run on geographically distributed instances of a Bamboo Services Platform, which will enable "always-available" guarantees to consumers of those services, and other useful efficiencies.

Partnerships with content providers, and with tool and application developers, will influence characteristics of a Platform. Technology architects will balance characteristics that best support new services and services in the general case, with choices that best align to key standards, practices, tools, and services already adopted by Bamboo's community and other national and international cyberinfrastructure initiatives.

Standardized infrastructure choices and automated procedures for realizing those choices will save money, time, and aggravation for humanists and support staff who must otherwise sink funds and effort into choosing, maintaining, and operating technology, hindering direct engagement with teaching and research.

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4.4 - Bamboo Community

The Bamboo Community section of this proposal will be included in a future draft.

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2 Comments

  1. Unknown User (alex.humphreys@jstor.org)

    I think that throughout this document it might be helpful to have sidebars that describe the concrete implications to the specific humanities scholar of the technology being discussed.  These might be narratives or use cases or somesuch, but they need to be little "what if" scenarios that help the reader understand the possibilities of the technology (I found the Atlas and Services sections particularly would benefit from this). It seems to me that the document could stand further grounding in the primary goal of improving the acts of pedagogy and scholarship for the humanities professor.  Perhaps these are intended to be within the Value sections (and so aren't written yet), but my fear is that that section will remain relatively abstract.  I think specific examples, ones that describe day-in-the-life scenarios, would get the document further to reaching its audience.

    1. Unknown User (masover@berkeley.edu)

      Thanks, Alex. We agree. The "placeholders" that we've put into the Value sections are for exactly this purpose, but to the extent that scholars can and do contribute the kinds of stories/narratives/use-cases you are describing in ways that fit well in sections other than Values, I don't think anyone could object to more liberal interleaving.

      There will be significant time at Workshop 5 next week devoted to identifying and fleshing out exactly these sorts of contributions.

      If you have (or anyone else reading these comments has) specific suggestions vis-a-vis particular stories/narratives/use-cases and/or particular scholar(s) who are well-situated to articulate those stories, please make suggestions ... here, in e-mail, and/or at our Washington workshop.