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This wiki space contains archival documentation of Project Bamboo, April 2008 - March 2013.

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Model and Visualize

Definition

Scholarly activity now includes use of digital tools to create remotely-accessible copies of physical objects of scholarly interest; to create or record objects of scholarly interest that are not otherwise persistent; and to build models of scholarly objects or scholarly analyses for discovery, review, and teaching.

It might be useful to separate modelling from visualization, since there's a strong theme of modelling in digital humanities parlance which positions modelling as part of data preparation: in activities such as schema design, text encoding, information design. In this sense it would be prior to many aspects of visualization, which often serves as a way of presenting this modelled data for scholarly usage.

Important themes in the discussion of modelling include questions of what kinds of strategic distance the model can usefully establish from the material being modelled: what kinds of interpretation are in play in the development of the model.


 

Name(s)

Institution(s)

Proposed/originated by:

Steve Masover

UC Berkeley

Current facilitator(s)

Facilitator_Name_Here_(optional)

Facilitator_Institution_Here_(optional)


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What tools, standards, organizations, or efforts exist in this area of scholarly practice?

Item

Description - what is it?

URL or other reference

Visualization Tool Kit

The Visualization ToolKit (VTK) is an open source, freely available software system for 3D computer graphics, image processing, and visualization used by thousands of researchers and developers around the world. [cf. Visualizing Joyce, Ian Gunn and Mark Wright, Hypermedia Joyce Studies, VOLUME 7, NUMBER 1, 2005-6 ISSN 1801-1020)] (Steve Masover)

VTK

Willard McCarty, "Modeling: A Study in Words and Meanings"

Intelligent article on modelling in digital humanities

Blackwells Companion to Digital Humanities


What tools, standards, organizations, or efforts are missing from this area of scholarly practice?

Item

Description - what is it?

URL or other reference

sound_byte_name_or_description (your_name)

summary_description (your_name)

http://www.interesting_thing.org


What part of this area of scholarly practice is within Project Bamboo scope, and why?

Item

Description - what is it?

Why is it in scope?

sound_byte_name_or_description (your_name)

summary_description (your_name)

explanation_of_why_in_scope (your_name)


What part of this area of scholarly practice is outside Project Bamboo scope, and why?

Item

Description - what is it?

Why is it out of scope?

sound_byte_name_or_description (your_name)

summary_description (your_name)

explanation_of_why_out_of_scope (your_name)


References

References (e.g., material from Workshop 1 notes or flipcharts)

Contributor

  • Making the invisible visible. Show & tell (other than through text) [...] Changeable modalities of representation [...] Virtual unification of physically disparate materials/objects [...] making virtual whole from parts (Ex 4 & 5 flipcharts, 1c-B)
  • Cultural restitution and reunification of artifacts (Ex 4 scribe notes, 1c-B)
  • Model/Visualization: archaeological sites; theatre stage sets; virtual sculpture; tele-immersive [...] performers; narrative/historical events [...]; geographic locations; buildings (including unrealized designs) [...] (Ex 4 & 5 flipcharts, 1c-B)
  • Only a very tiny portion of buildings that get designed actually get built, so allowing people access to those that haven't been built. (Ex 5 scribe notes, 1c-B)
  • Interactive visualization - where the subject maintains an impact on what is being shown. (Ex 5 scribe notes, 1c-B)
  • Can be used in literary contexts as well. Non-linear narratives like Joyce's Ulysses (Wandering Rocks) at points can be visualized. (Ex. 2 scribe notes, 1c-B) [cf. Visualizing Joyce, Ian Gunn and Mark Wright, Hypermedia Joyce Studies, VOLUME 7, NUMBER 1, 2005-6 ISSN 1801-1020)]
  • Alternative to publication? Sits between publication and broadcasting. (Ex 5 scribe notes, 1c-B)
  • Bamboo platform could provide a means (Bamboo theatre - Hu-Tube (HumanitiesTube) (Ex 5 scribe notes, 1c-B)
  • Collection of material - theatre interviews with production designers and those related to the production, VRML models of the theatre. (Ex. 2 scribe notes, 1c-B)
  • "maybe creating a humanities front end to some scientific tool e.g., a visualization tool to make it work for the humanities." (1b Scribe Notes)

Steve Masover

  • "Provide novel forms of expression (visual, virtual reality, 3D, and time compression)." ("Summit on Digital Tools for the Humanities," UVA, 2005, Final Report: Collaboration, p. 15)
  • "Tools to define narrative pathways through a three-dimensional environment, attaching content to locations along the path, and with the ability to explain at each juncture why particular paths were chosen." ("Summit on Digital Tools for the Humanities," UVA, 2005, Final Report: Collaboration, p. 16)
  • "Tools to translate between representation-rich formats at a sophisticated level, with annotation and toleration for limited ambiguity." ("Summit on Digital Tools for the Humanities," UVA, 2005, Final Report: Collaboration, p. 16)
  • "Any interpretation of the past is an attempt to piece together fragmentary data, dispersed in space and time. Even so-called 'intact' cultural historical sites brought to light after centuries, or even millennia of deposition are rarely perfect fossils or freeze-frames of human activity prior to their abandonment. In this sense, all work with material remains constitutes an archaeology of fragments. However, the degree and nature of such fragmentation can vary significantly. Historical landscapes coexisting with modern cityscapes produce far more fragmented records compared to open-air sites. It is both the spatial and temporal configuration of excavations in the city that causes the archaeological record to become further fragmented at the post-depositional stage. The sequence and duration of excavations is frequently determined by non-archaeological considerations (building activity, public works, etc.) and the sites are dispersed over large areas. Thus, it becomes problematic to keep track of hundreds of excavations (past and present) and to maintain a relational understanding of individual sites. On the other hand, it is clear that historical habitation itself can also contribute to the fragmentation of the record. Places with a rich occupation history do not simply consist of a past and a present. Rather, they comprise temporal sequences intertwined in three-dimensional space; the destruction of archaeological remains that is caused by overlapping habitation levels can be considerable." ("Summit on Digital Tools for the Humanities," UVA, 2005, Final Report: Visualization of Time, Space, and Uncertainty, p. 19)
  • Discussion of [...] various approaches to this cluster of related issues led us to think of the solution to the problem [of Visualization of Time, Space, and Uncertainty] as entailing not so much a new software tool as a software 'machine,' i.e., an integrated suite of tools. This machine would allow us to collect data, evaluate them as to their reliability/probability, set them into a time frame, define their temporal relationships with other features of interest in our study, and, finally, represent their degree of (un)certainty by visual conventions of stylized rendering and by the mathematical expressions stated in fuzzy logic or some alternative representation. [...] There are seven goals that this machine needs to fill, listed below. The first five are based on Colin Ware's work on visualization; we added the last two items. ("Summit on Digital Tools for the Humanities," UVA, 2005, Final Report: Visualization of Time, Space, and Uncertainty, p. 21)
    • Facilitating understanding of large amounts of data.
    • Perception of unanticipated emergent properties in the data.
    • Illumination of problems in the quality of the data.
    • Promoting understanding of large- and small-scale features of the data.
    • Facilitating hypothesis formation.
    • Promoting interpretation of the data.
    • Understanding different values and perspectives on the data.

Steve Masover

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