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This wiki space contains archival documentation of Project Bamboo, April 2008 - March 2013.

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Use of Social Media

Definition

Social media refers to a rapidly-changing collection of technology tools and cultural practices which emphasize the building of formal and informal networks of affiliation, shared interest, and affinity between individuals. The use of social media for dissemination of ideas and experiences creates an audience expectation of the ability to link to, comment on, interact with, and repurpose the content. Social media is playing an increasing role in the life and work of incoming graduate students and new hires.

As we consider digital forms of social media it is also worth looking back at non-digital forms through which these activities were conducted in the past, and the kinds of architectures and spaces that support them. Events and activities like colloquia, seminars, and conferences (as well as more informal collegial interactions through institutional spaces such as departmental buildings, bulletin boards, and the like) supported the development of networks of individuals with shared interests and commitments. Similarly, in textual space such interactions are supported across both space and time (through footnotes, acknowledgements, citations, and advising roles). How are these spaces changing with the rise of digitally mediated social networks? and are the social networks themselves changing as well?


 

Name(s)

Institution(s)

Proposed/originated by:

Quinn Dombrowski

University of Chicago

Current facilitator(s)

Facilitator_Name_Here_(optional)

Facilitator_Institution_Here_(optional)


Back to Identify Themes page...


What tools, standards, organizations, or efforts exist in this area of scholarly practice?

Item

Description - what is it?

URL or other reference

sound_byte_name_or_description (your_name)

summary_description (your_name)

http://www.interesting_thing.org

MeAggregator

MeAggregator is a JISC funded project allowing the user to integrate and disseminate information from a wide range of institutional and third party sources, incorporating a peer trust model and folksonomological ontologies.

http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/programme_elearning_capital/el_tsle/meaggregator.aspx

Graduate Junction

The Graduate Junction has a bold vision to bring together Masters, Doctoral and Postdoctoral researchers from across disciplines and around the world to create an online global research community.

http://www.graduatejunction.com/

Academia.edu


Academia.edu does two things:

  • It displays academics around the world in a tree format, according to what university/department they are affiliated with.
  • It enables an academic to have an easy-to-maintain academic webpage.

http://www.academia.edu/

Edublogs

"Blogging for teachers and students, made easy."

edublogs.org


What tools, standards, organizations, or efforts are missing from this area of scholarly practice?

Item

Description - what is it?

URL or other reference

sound_byte_name_or_description (your_name)

summary_description (your_name)

http://www.interesting_thing.org


What part of this area of scholarly practice is within Project Bamboo scope, and why?

Item

Description - what is it?

Why is it in scope?

sound_byte_name_or_description (your_name)

summary_description (your_name)

explanation_of_why_in_scope (your_name)


What part of this area of scholarly practice is outside Project Bamboo scope, and why?

Item

Description - what is it?

Why is it out of scope?

sound_byte_name_or_description (your_name)

summary_description (your_name)

explanation_of_why_out_of_scope (your_name)


References

References (e.g., material from Workshop 1 notes or flipcharts)

Contributor

  • Facebook popular with save minority languages movements, find events (Ex. 6a scribe notes, 1b-A)
  • High print based, self-selected group of students. Behaviors at my inst. are extensions of traditional methods. e.g. Google books, Zotero. Social networking. More of a blending of their social and their academic networking. Facebook used for both. Blogging random thoughts and academic interests. Which leads to an interesting re-configuration what a colleague is... (Ex. 6a scribe notes, 1b-C)
  • Networking not used so much for research - for their own purposes. More in the sense of when students are assigned to use these tools. Visualization techniques are up and coming practices. To compare content that otherwise had to be described. Also used for ethnography, creating websites that map out terrains. (Ex. 6a scribe notes, 1b-C)
  • Online predisposition, an assumption of ubiquitous connectivity; assumption of online collaborative applications (Ex. 6a scribe notes, 1b-D)

Quinn Dombrowski

  •  "Social networking/sharing of citations and annotations applied to research environments across institutions." (Ex. 6b scribe notes, 1d-A)
  • "There's a blurred, fluid movement between social and other networking for interactions. Tremendous use of FaceBook, MySpace for things, including research. Their interests are interwoven: can't easily separate personal & research interests." (Ex. 6b scribe notes, 1d-A)
  • "UNCONSCIOUS COLLABORATION -- accidental collaboration (working through footnotes, finding annotations in texts, blogging feedback)" (Ex. 2 scribe notes, 1d-C)
  • "Blogs are like going back to an earlier form of journals. Wonder what kind of changes we'll see in 20 years, where young people have lived in collaborative open when all their lives.  They document everything. " (Ex. 2 scribe notes, 1d-G)
  • "Scholars only want to put out the finished product; want to hide all failures along the way.  One interesting thing about blogs, etc. is it makes the "marginalia" of the research process more visible.  Provide more exposure of the working process." (Ex 2 scribe notes, 1d-G)
  • "Would a social networking project be more of a time suck than anything else? (think of the time we already see our students spending on facebook)." (Ex 2 scribe notes, 1a-C)
  • " if we were in the 18th century, the Federalist Papers would be a blog." (Ex. 3 scribe notes, 1d-B)
  • "T1: .... Don't have short research notes, like they do in the sciences. We don't have that. We need a whole narrative, an argument.  When we do delineate they are in 25 pg white papers for funders which no one wants to read.
    G1:  Wiki has talk-thru pages where people haggle what goes into an article. We don't  have a space where we can talk about the process in process. It's what doesn't get spoken; wrestling w/ the parts of the process.
    C1:  That's where the vetting occurs.
    C2:  The blogosphere is one extreme of that. Need a place where you can throw out, where the annealing starts, where the argument takes form.
    T1:  The balance now in humanities is toward darkness.
    C2:  We want shadowy place in between, the crepuscular." (Ex. 3 scribe notes, 1d-G)
  • a potential source of community participation (Ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b-C)
  • an aid to interdisciplinary collaboration: "Make it easier - Facebook, Linked In, Bebo - like tool could be useful (Proneto, Plaxo)" (Ex. 4 scribe notes, 1d-A)
  • as a mechanism for "Informal dissemination (blogs, podcasts, etc)" (Ex. 4 scribe notes, 1d-H)

Kaylea Hascall Champion

Steve Masover

What do scholars mean by 'scholarly networking'? was a blog post by Steve Masover exploring the broad definition of this theme. George Otte's thoughtful response is worth considering as a "scholarly networking" platform is shaped.

Steve Masover

Back to Identify Themes page...

1 Comment

  1. Unknown User (john wolffe)

    There are exciting ideas here, which we have just discussed in a meeting of the local Bamboo team at the Open University. It seems to us that the endeavour to achieve an effective application of social networking tools to strengthen research collaboration in the Arts and Humanities should be a key future direction for Bamboo.
     But we need to clarify the nature of the task. It is not primarily a technical one, as many tools already exist (although there is obviously work to be done in evaluating which of them are most useful for our purposes, and then in developing and adapting them accordingly). Rather the challenge is socio-technical, with the emphasis on organizational issues, in seeking to engage our scholarly communities in such an enterprise, and in establishing the structure, norms, and protocols for such an engagement.
     To be  worthwhile, social networking of researchers needs to be avoid being either on the one hand an elitist club (replicating the peer-reviewed journal in another medium), or on the other hand a random association that lacks direction and authoritative expertise, and ends up wasting everyone's time, eventually collapsing under the consequent weight of unfocused contributions and collective apathy.
     Rather, central to our vision would be the promotion of structured interaction between senior scholars and younger/newer researchers, a process from which all parties would have much to gain. This kind of interchange would offer direct benefits in terms of sharing of subject expertise and methodologies, but could also prove fruitful in establishing new directions for shared technology services, in promoting a cross-fertilization of the often greater technical enthusiasm and expertise of newer researchers with the greater scholarly knowledge and experience of senior scholars. We would also see technical and library colleagues having a significant role to play in such conversations. The technical issues include identifying relatively future-proof ways to characterize and share academic practices in Arts and Humanities, using the latest research tools from computationally-rich research such as that prosecuted by the Knowledge Media Institute at the Open University. Useful parallels can be drawn with evolving scholarly practices and tool use in technology-dependent disciplines outside Arts and Humanities.
     We are currently considering setting up our own pilot Arts and Humanities researchers' social networking project linking a group of our own PhD students with early career academics and some more senior researchers. As a non-campus university, we have a physically dispersed research student community (including some students in North America and continental Europe), and so we have a particular institutional interest in developing mechanisms for strengthening virtual academic community. Thus we could offer something of a microcosm of how much wider inter-institutional and international networking might be made to work in the future. If this venture would be of interest to the wider Bamboo community, we should be pleased to explore ways of linking it into the overall process of identifying and scoping future directions, with a view to deriving maximum mutual benefit from our efforts.