Navigation:
Documentation
Archive



Page Tree:

Child pages
  • Forage (includes Discover)

This wiki space contains archival documentation of Project Bamboo, April 2008 - March 2013.

Skip to end of metadata
Go to start of metadata

Forage  (includes Discover)

Definition

In scholarly practice, foraging is an activity that combines directed searching with serendipity of a sort that allows a scholar to stumble across material that can be related to the object of the directed search in unexpected and perhaps surprising ways.

Comment (Jim Muehlenberg, Univ. of Wisconsin):  In seeking themes centered on scholarly activities undertaken against research materials, the theme that emerged for me is "Discover" which seems to be about the same as "Forage" and which seems also to be a precursor to "Filter and Synthesize."  Discover seems focused on the basic search and retrieval process, or other means of locating materials of interest, whether intentional or accidental; it may include being directed to materials by colleagues or by digital agents or services (e.g., old-fashioned SDI, or RSS feeds), or by citations found within other research materials.  The Minnesota study also suggests "Discovery" leads to finding forms of assistance relevant to scholarship, beyond the research materials or objects of study themselves.


 

Name(s)

Institution(s)

Proposed/originated by:

Steve Masover

UC Berkeley

Current facilitator(s)

Facilitator_Name_Here_(optional)

Facilitator_Institution_Here_(optional)


Back to Identify Themes page...


What tools, standards, organizations, or efforts exist in this area of scholarly practice?

Item

Description - what is it?

URL or other reference

Zotero

A Firefox web-browser extension that serves as a "research tool that helps you gather, organize, and analyze sources (citations, full texts, web pages, images, and other objects), and lets you share the results of your research in a variety of ways." (quoted by Steve Masover)

zotero.org

Heurist

"captures and manages all your web bookmarks, bibliographic references, personal notes and a host of other specialised data types (expandable) in a simple, searchable web interface" (quoted by Steve Masover)

heuristscholar.org

Google Scholar Alerts

"Now you can create alerts for queries of your interest. When new articles that match your alert query are added to Google Scholar, we’ll send you an email update with links to these articles." (Google Scholar blog of 15 June 2010); also cf. Chronicle of Higher Ed story of 1 Jul 2010.

Google Scholar


What tools, standards, organizations, or efforts are missing from this area of scholarly practice?

Item

Description - what is it?

URL or other reference

sound_byte_name_or_description (your_name)

summary_description (your_name)

http://www.interesting_thing.org


What part of this area of scholarly practice is within Project Bamboo scope, and why?

Item

Description - what is it?

Why is it in scope?

sound_byte_name_or_description (your_name)

summary_description (your_name)

explanation_of_why_in_scope (your_name)


What part of this area of scholarly practice is outside Project Bamboo scope, and why?

Item

Description - what is it?

Why is it out of scope?

sound_byte_name_or_description (your_name)

summary_description (your_name)

explanation_of_why_out_of_scope (your_name)


References

References (e.g., material from Workshop 1 notes or flipcharts)

Contributor

  • "foraging combines discovery and serendipity; that kind of investigation can inform both linear and untraditional forms of understanding" (ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b - B)
  • "sampling to find things in places you wouldn't ordinarily look" (ex. 2-3 flipcharts, group 1a-A)
  • Finding information is the storage problem, not storing megabytes of content. (ex 1 scribe notes, 1c-C)
  • "Interface to the data that allows us to 'go fishing'" (ex. 4 scribe notes, 1d - B)

Steve Masover

  •  Looking at physical archives is a richer experience due to serendipity of how one browses and finds. When looking through an internet portal, one misses "incidentally related" materials. (ex. 2 scribe notes, 1b-C)
  • Foraging: reading, searching, seeing, posting on list serves, conversing, brainstorming (ex. 3 scribe notes, 1b-D)
  • Chinese art historian: she runs into challenges with foraging, seeking stuff and also working in nonverbal script, non-Western language she's interested in producing visual content (ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b-B)
  • likes the verb "foraging"; it applies on different levels to the cognitive process he produces CDs, self-sustaining projects; producing stuff with public television, etc. (ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b-B)
  • librarian at large state school, runs institutional repository; foraging provides a way for her to find value in the weird stuff she has in her repository (ex. 4 scribe notes, 1b-B)
  • One of the things that technology brings a benefit in is: when you have a huge pile of material, the unassisted person can only scope one thing at a time, can only see things in the order they come. Technological assistance can help see patterns across materials. (ex. 4 scribe notes, 1c-A)
  • Discovery
    • Staying current with discourse in your field
    • Finding validated or trustworthy primary data on a research subject
    • Enjoying serendipitous discoveries (ex. 3 scribe notes, 1b-E)

Quinn Dombrowski

  • Find source materials
    • Primary - stories, original materials
    • Secondary - analysis, interpretations, etc  (Ex. 2 scribe notes, 1a-A)
  • Go through database; go through memory; find secondary literature; access databases through web browser  (Ex. 2 scribe notes, 1a-B)
  • Locating the archives
    • Where are the videos, and dig through the catalogue
    • Will catalogues become increasingly redundant?
    • How can catalogers anticipate what researchers want? ...
    • Technologies being developed that would hopefully have a revolutionary impact.
    • Image-based image searching, for example.  (Ex. 2 scribe notes, 1c-B)
  • Informed scanning/trawling across often unstructured repositories and collections  (Ex.2-3 flipcharts, 1d-C)
  • D10: Finding everything full text on the web, versus going to the library, if it's not online then it's not of interest.  (Ex. 6a scribe notes, 1b-C)

Jim Muehlenberg

Steve Masover

Back to Identify Themes page...